Teaching Innovation & Learning Enhancement

Bringing people from different disciplines and sectors together to discuss ways to overcome issues in education using evidence-based findings

About TILE

TILE is a new, interdisciplinary network that spans across educational sectors. Our mission is to start a conversation between different groups interested in improving teaching and learning through sharing of best practice in education and disseminating research-based findings. Read our full mission statement here.

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If you want to contribute to our blog or share your best practice with us (we feature best practice examples here), please get in touch: tile@psy.gla.ac.uk

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TILE Youtube Channel

TILE Talks/Webinars

TILE Talks/Webinars 2020

All announcements here: TILE Talk/Webinar Announcements

24 Nov (Webinar): Explorathon 2020: More Than 1+1: Supporting Highly Able Maths Minds In The Classroom

 

The Scottish Network for Able Pupils and the TILE Network are delighted to host a webinar as part of the European Researcher’s Night. Bringing together experts from Scotland, Sweden and Germany we will explore how we can support highly able mathematicians in our classrooms. This webinar will be of interest to teachers, student teachers, policy makers, parents, authority personnel and all who have an interest in mathematics.

Tuesday, 24 November 2020 @ 4pm

Registration: https://tile24nov2020.eventbrite.co.uk

We will use the hashtag #HighlyAbleMathsMinds for this event.

 

Programme:

4.00-4.15pm: Introduction | Dr Margaret Sutherland, SNAP, University of Glasgow, UK

4:15-4:30pm : How To Foster Mathematically Gifted Students In Times Of Corona | Prof Dr Marianne Nolte | University of Hamburg, Germany

At the University of Hamburg we work with mathematically gifted students starting with  third graders up to 9th graders. The students get one problem which is complex and challenging. But, no more than the usual acquired knowledge is necessary to work on the problem. One session takes 90 minutes. Since midst of March we stopped presence sessions. We offered correspondence circles and have since August switched to digital sessions. In this talk I will present our observations and give a short impression about the reactions of students and parents.

4:30-4:45pm: Supporting Mathematically Highly Able Students In Sweden | Dr Elisabet Mellroth | Karlstad Municipality, Sweden

It has been a tradition in Sweden for very long to focus on helping each student reach the passing level in school, little if any focus has been given to those who learn with ease, that is the highly able students. The consequences have been that children who learn mathematics easily often has been forced to redo mathematics over and over again or being offered next level without any chances of getting grades. For the student this causes a lot of frustration and in the worst cases self-destructive behavior and/or dropping out from school. When students with high ability in mathematics are offered structured support with a long-term plan and when they are given opportunities to work with likeminded it means a lot for their knowledge development as well for their social development. In 2015 the Swedish National agency of education released a support material for teaching highly able students. Since than some municipalities have started to work on developing strategies of how to meet their highly able students. In my talk I will give examples of the newly released strategy plan from Stockholm City, the largest municipality in Sweden. 

 

4.45-5.00pm: Just Harder Sums? Challenges In Conceptions Of The Mathematical Sciences And Transitions To University-Level Studies | Dr Andrew Wilson, University of Glasgow, UK

At a time of global change, mathematical sciences occupy an increasingly central role – both overtly and covertly – in shaping and guiding our lives. They are social, creative, living and breathing subjects from which all of society benefits, oftentimes inadvertently. However, this understanding is frequently absent in students as they transition into Higher Education. This presentation will share insights on the common challenges we encounter, together with an initiative designed to connect children and young people with this realisation. In our transdisciplinary photo competition, we provide a framework to identify, consider and celebrate the maths surrounding us: the maths inside. Fostering curiosity, creativity, and creating opportunity for participants to embark on a journey of discovery towards making deeper mathematical connections, this project is especially well matched to the needs of those with highly able minds.

5.00-5.30pm: Questions and Answers

About the speakers:

Prof Dr Marianne Nolte is professor for mathematical didactics at the University of Hamburg (retired autumns 2019). She established a foster and research program for mathematically gifted primary grade students, which she runs since 1999, adapted and further developed from the program of the William Stern Society Hamburg (WSG) for mathematically highly gifted students from 7th grade up to Abitur (headed by the late Prof. K. Kießwetter). In the meantime, this program was extended year by year to the classes of the secondary level with less intensity than the WSG program. Beside her own professional experience as a teacher she worked as a therapist for students with dyscalculia. Thus, she also established a master program for prospective therapists together in a multi-professional team. Her main areas of research are mathematical giftedness, twice exceptional students and dyscalculia. She is president of MCG (International Group for Mathematical Creativity and Giftedness) and president of WSG Hamburg.

 

 

Dr Elisabet Mellroth has a Ph.D. in educational work, her research focus is on how teachers can include highly able students in learning. She is a guest lecturer at Örebro university and affiliated researcher at Karlstad university. She also works as a mathematics teacher in upper secondary school were, she also is responsible for some school development projects. She gives seminars on gifted education all over Sweden for municipalities and teacher education. She is a committee member in the International group of Mathematics Creativity and Giftedness and in the European Council of High Ability.

 

 

 

 

Dr Andrew Wilson is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Glasgow School of Mathematics and Statistics, the Convenor of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society Education Committee, and Convenor of the School Outreach Committee. His talk Embedding Play in Higher Education attracted the vote of peers to win best presentation at the 11th University of Glasgow Learning and Teaching Conference in 2018. His outreach project Street Maths, was awarded the 2016 Wellcome Trust ISSF Award for Innovation in Public Engagement. Andrew founded and directs the transdisciplinary maths inside photo competition that seeks to spark the mathematical curiosity of the nation, and raise awareness of the often unseen mathematics all around us. His work in improving student assessment and feedback experience attracted both College and University Teaching Excellence Awards in 2014 and 2015 respectively and the project’s success – including the introduction of e-Assessment into the undergraduate syllabus – was further honoured with a Herald Innovation Technology Excellence Award in 2016. This was a large collaborative team project involving many colleagues across the School. Andrew’s interests include Assessment and Feedback to Large Cohorts, e-Assessment, Widening Participation, Outreach, Student Engagement, and playfulness in Higher Education. He can be contacted by email and on Twitter @tentivetodetail.

Webinar announcement!

18 Nov (Webinar): Prof David Putwain | Exam Anxiety: Is it Something To Worry About?

Exam Anxiety: Is it Something To Worry About?

Prof David Putwain
(Centre of Educational Research | School of Education | Liverpool John Moores University, UK)

Wedneday, 18 Nov 2020 @ 4pm | REGISTRATION REQUIRED!

Register for this webinar here: https://tile18nov2020.eventbrite.co.uk 

 

Abstract:  

Anecdotal evidence would indicate that in the past five years or so, a greater number of adolescent secondary school students are seeking support to deal with the anxiety and pressure associated with preparing for, and taking, high-stakes exams. This has prompted questions such as why more students are requesting help, how many are experiencing high levels of anxiety and whether this figure is increasing, what the effects of exam anxiety might be, and what can schools do about it. In this webinar, Professor Putwain will be sharing findings from research largely conducted from 2016 to 2020 into the prevalence of exam anxiety, relations with achievement and mental health, and interventions designed to reduce exam anxiety.

 

About the speaker:

Professor David Putwain is based in the Centre of Educational Research in the School of Education at Liverpool John Moores University. He taught Psychology and Sociology in schools and 6th form colleges from 1994 to 2006. After completing a PhD in 2006, David joined Edge Hill University working initially in the Department of Social and Psychological Sciences and subsequently in the Faculty of Education, before joining Liverpool John Moores University in 2016. His research focuses on how psychological factors including motivation, emotion, and engagement, influence, and in turn are influenced by, learning and achievement.

Talk announcement!

 

2 Nov (Webinar): Dr Victoria Simms | Influences On Early Mathematical Skills: What Counts?

Influences On Early Mathematical Skills: What Counts?

Dr Victoria Simms
(Research Director Psychology | Ulster University |UK)

Monday, 2 Nov 2020 @ 4pm | REGISTRATION REQUIRED!

Register for this webinar here: https://tile2nov2020.eventbrite.co.uk 

 

Abstract:  

In this talk I will summarise a number of studies that investigate the development of early mathematical skills. The talk will explore the influence of domain specific and domain general skills, as well as the home environment, on early mathematical development. Reflecting on our recent reviews of class-room practice and mathematical interventions, I will discuss how “basic” developmental and cognitive research may influence practice.

 

About the speaker:
Dr Victoria Simms is a developmental psychologist with a specific interest in how children’s thinking changes over time. Victoria’s research program focuses on the development of mathematical cognition, both in typical and atypical populations. Victoria also researches cognitive and educational outcomes of children who were born very preterm. Victoria’s work aims to develop effective interventions to ensure that children can fulfil their educational potential. You can follow her on Twitter: @DrVicSimms.

Talk announcement!

 

14 Oct (Webinar): Tim Beattie | Digital Learning In Our New Normal

Digital Learning In Our New Normal

Tim Beattie
(Principal Teacher of Learning and Teaching | Harris Academy | Dundee, UK)

Wednesday, 14 October 2020 @ 4pm | REGISTRATION REQUIRED!

Register for this webinar here: https://tile14oct2020.eventbrite.co.uk

 

Abstract:  

The current climate we find ourselves in regarding education in schools, has presented many challenges as well as opportunities for learning and teaching. As schools closed across the nation, practitioners adapted to new ways of teaching. Many of these ‘new ways’ were effective and indeed efficient with school doors closed, but as we move into a new normal with classrooms open, mid-term absences and an uncertain future – what have we learned? As we reflect on the past year what can we bring with us that will have the biggest impact on our learners moving forward. Amongst others, included in this discussion will be, a whole school approach to clarity regarding digital engagement, digital technologies used for learning and teaching, and building resilience and capacity in learners.

 

About the speaker:
Tim Beattie is the Principal teacher of learning and teaching at Harris Academy in Dundee. He also makes up one quarter of the RMPS department there and works a few days a week as part of Dundee City Council’s pedagogy team. You can follow him on Twitter: @LandTHarris.

Talk announcement!

 

18 June (Webinar): Back To School: What Did We Do? What Did We Learn?

 

This webinar is jointly organised by the School of Education and the TILE Network at the University of Glasgow. The free event is particularly aimed at primary and secondary teachers and those in management positions within schools as well as education authority representatives. However, everyone interested in the topic is welcome to attend.

 

 

Abstract: 

As schools across the world are returning to classrooms thoughts are turning to the many practical issues that need to be addressed to ensure safety, health and well-being and appropriate curriculum opportunities. Some countries already back in school and there is much we can learn from staff in these countries. This webinar will draw on the experiences of three teachers from Scotland who are now working in Hong Kong and Beijing. They all have practical experiences to share that will help you to plan and think through the issues as you prepare to welcome learners back to your classrooms.

About the speakers:

Rehana Shanks took up post as Principal of ESF Sha Tin Junior School in August 2019, moving from Edinburgh, Scotland with her family. She is on a career break from her substantive Headship with The City of Edinburgh Council. She is the current serving Chair of BELMAS (British Educational Leadership Management Administration Society). Rehana completed her undergraduate degree at The University of Glasgow. She has a Masters Degree in Educational Management and Leadership and is in her final year of her Doctorate of Education. Rehana is delighted to be working at ESF Sha Tin Junior School where she can deploy her passion for teaching and learning and associated teacher learning. You can follow her on Twitter: @rehanashanks.

Paul Campbell teaches Year 6 (Primary 7) at a large international school in Hong Kong, where he also leads Mathematics across the school’s foundation of 22 schools. From August, Paul will be taking up the role of Lead Teacher, working with teams across his school on curriculum, assessment, and quality assurance. Paul is also a post-graduate researcher on the Doctor of Education (EdD) programme at the University of Glasgow. He is in Year 5 of the programme, writing his thesis on collaboration for school and system wide improvement, using Scotland as a case. Paul is also Vice-Chair of the International Professional Development Association (IPDA). You can follow him on Twitter: @PCampbell91.

Athole McLauchlan is currently a Grade 2 Homeroom Teacher at an international school in Beijing called the Western Academy of Beijing. His duties also include being the G2 Grade Level Leader and Pedagogical Leader. Previously, Athole worked for nearly 17 years as a primary teacher in a variety of schools and local authorities in Scotland. This included a spell as a Development Officer with Education Scotland and as a Principal Teacher. Athole recently graduated with a Masters in Educational Studies from Glasgow University. Athole has been a virtual teacher in an online classroom since the 29th of January, and has just completed 18 weeks of being a 3D teacher in a 2D world!” You can follow him on Twitter: @athole.

Talk announcement!

 

15 June (Webinar): Dr Emily Nordmann & Dr Jill MacKay | 10 Simple Rules For Supporting A Temporary Online Pivot

1o Simple Rules For Supporting A Temporary Online Pivot

Dr Emily Nordmann & Dr Jill MacKay
(School of Psychology | University of Glasgow, UK & Research Fellow in Veterinary Medical Education | The University of Edinburgh)

Monday, 15 June 2020 @ 4pm | REGISTRATION REQUIRED! Register for this webinar here: https://tile15june2020.eventbrite.co.uk

 

Abstract:  

As continued COVID-19 disruption looks likely across the world, contingency plans are being drawn-up for the 2020-2021 academic year. This includes delivering face-to-face programmes fully-online for both new and continuing cohorts of students. This temporary pivot will necessitate distance teaching and learning across almost every conceivable pedagogy, from fundamental degrees to professionally accredited ones. In this seminar we will discuss our new preprint “10 simple rules for supporting a temporary online pivot in higher education” and how, despite much of what is to come being far from simple, there are a number of underlying principles that can be used to support the planning process (and how these rules don’t just apply to higher education, despite the focus of the paper). We will also present interdisciplinary examples for online pivot plans that are built around the 10 rules. Finally, we will end with a discussion of the concerns and challenges that face you as educators. To allow us to tailor this discussion, we would be grateful if you could complete this short questionnaire before the seminar. The full paper can be downloaded here https://psyarxiv.com/qdh25

 

About the speakers:

Dr Emily Nordmann is a teaching-focused lecturer in the School of Psychology, University of Glasgow. The main focus of her pedagogical research is how lecture capture can be used as an effective learning tool. She teaches statistics and research methods using R and is a firm supporter of open and reproducible research practices and educational resources. You can follow her on Twitter @EmilyNordmann.

Dr Jill MacKay is a Lecturer in Veterinary Science Education at the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies. Her research interests mainly lie within research methodology and exploring how students learn in digital environments. She has been known to play the odd video game. You can follow her on Twitter: @jilly_mackay.

All authors of this project:

  • Emily Nordmann, Level 1 Year Lead, School of Psychology, University of Glasgow
  • Chiara Horlin, MSc Online Distance Learning Programme Lead, School of Psychology, University of Glasgow
  • Jacqui Hutchison, Level 1 Course Lead, School of Psychology, University of Aberdeen
  • Jo-Anne Murray, Assistant Vice-Principal for Digital Education, University of Glasgow
  • Louise Robson, Director of Learning and Teaching, Department of Biomedical Science, University of Sheffield
  • Michael Seery, Director of Teaching, School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh
  • Jill MacKay, UG Course Organiser, Distance Learning PG Course Organiser, University of Edinburgh

Talk announcement!

 

21 May (Webinar): Dr Yvonne Skipper | “I think I can”: Using Mindset-Based Interventions in the Classroom

“I think I can”: Using Mindset-Based Interventions in the Classroom

Dr Yvonne Skipper
(Senior Lecturer in Psychology | School of Education | University of Glasgow, UK)

Thursday, 21 May 2020 @ 4pm | REGISTRATION REQUIRED! Register for this webinar here: https://tile21may2020.eventbrite.co.uk

 

Abstract:  

Carol Dweck’s work on mindsets suggests that people view intelligence in different ways. Some view intelligence as malleable (a growth mindset) while others view it as a stable trait (termed a fixed mindset). Literature has suggested that more of a growth mindset can lead to positive educational outcomes such as holding learning rather than performance goals and persisting following failure.
In this presentation, I will discuss how we have used this framework in three ways. Firstly, we developed a mindset intervention for university students. The intervention group participated in a session which explored brain plasticity, which is a component of growth mindset belief, while the control group learned about memory. Results suggested that the intervention promoted more of a growth mindset and led to more positive learning behaviours. Secondly, we worked with Stoke-on-Trent City Council to co-create a growth mindset toolkit for Year 1 school pupils which aimed to enhance literacy. This light touch intervention was trialled with N=443 pupils from 5 intervention and 4 control schools. Results suggested that the intervention promoted more of a growth mindset and enhanced phonics and sentence reading but not comprehension. Finally, we developed ‘White Water Writers’, an intervention which gives groups of people the opportunity to collaboratively write and publish a full-length novel in a week (www.whitewaterwriters.com). This aims to promote self-belief and literacy. Data from interviews, school results and pre and post-test questionnaires suggests that the project enhances literacy and self-belief.
Taken together these findings suggest that while there is some debate around the theory of mindsets and how the framework fits together, our interventions have had a positive impact on learners.

 

About the speaker:
Dr Yvonne Skipper recently moved to the University of Glasgow as a Senior Lecturer in Psychology. Her research focusses how we can motivate and engage learners of all ages. She researches topics such as teacher feedback, how peers learn together and why girls drop out of science subjects. She is passionate about moving theory into practice and ensuring that my work has a real-world impact.
She uses a co-creation approach, working closely with partner organisations to bring together psychology and ‘real world’ knowledge to solve educational problems. She has developed of a number of initiatives, such as a toolkit to promote a malleable view of intelligence and ‘White Water Writers’, which gives groups of people the opportunity to write and publish their own novel in a week. You can follow her on Twitter: @YvonneSkipper.

Talk announcement!

 

16 Apr (Webinar): Dr Jill MacKay | Playful Learning in Professional Degrees: Horsing Around With Vet Students

Playful Learning in Professional Degrees: Horsing Around With Vet Students

Dr Jill MacKay
(Research Fellow in Veterinary Medical Education | The University of Edinburgh, UK)

Thursday, 16 April 2020 @ 4pm | REGISTRATION REQUIRED! Register for this webinar here: https://tile16apr2020.eventbrite.co.uk

Abstract: 

Education programmes have a responsibility to teach their students resilience and adaptability, and this is particularly important in professionalised programmes such as veterinary medicine where ‘failures’ can be high cost and relatively common. Playful scenarios can be a useful tool in these settings, particularly if they encourage learners to deal with uncomfortable situations in a managed space. In partnership with students, we developed a playful roleplay scenario for first year veterinary students in a UK veterinary school. After our second year of running the scenario, we offer our perspective on the value of play in professionalised settings, and how failure and resilience training can be scaffolded into learning and teaching throughout a programme.

About the speaker:

Dr Jill MacKay is a Lecturer in Veterinary Science Education at the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies. Her research interests mainly lie within research methodology and exploring how students learn in digital environments. She has been known to play the odd video game. You can follow her on Twitter: @jilly_mackay.

18 Mar (Webinar): Dr Kasia Banas | How Do First-Year Psychology Students Study? Embedding Lecture Recording in Wider Study Practices

How Do First-Year Psychology Students Study? Embedding Lecture Recording in Wider Study Practices.

Dr Kasia Banas
(Lecturer in Behavioural Sciences in Healthcare | University of Glasgow, UK)

Wednesday, 18 March 2020 @ 4pm | Webinar via Zoom: https://uofglasgow.zoom.us/j/409655993

Abstract: 

Lecture recording continues to be a much-discussed topic in education, and there is a growing amount of evidence that accessing recorded lectures at home can be a beneficial revision practice. This may be especially true among students whose first language is not English, or those who have other responsibilities beside their university course. In this talk, I will present preliminary results from an ongoing study of first-year psychology students at the University of Edinburgh, where we collected data about their use of lecture recordings, as well as administrative and questionnaire data on other learning practices and attitudes. A novel aspect of this study was its focus on norms, where we asked students to report what they thought their lecturers’ and classmates’ attitudes towards lecture attendance and lecture recording were. One interesting result was that while students reported that their lecturers set a positive norm for attending lectures, they were not sure what their lecturers thought about using recordings as a substitute for attending live lectures. I will discuss this and other preliminary findings, focusing on the potential targets for an online intervention that we plan to deliver to all first-year students next year. Project collaborators: Eva Murzyn and Anita Tobar-Henriquez.

About the speaker:

Dr Kasia Banas is a Lecturer in Behavioural Sciences in Healthcare within the School of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing, University of Glasgow. She is a social psychologist by training and has a keen interest in how social factors influence behaviour, including studying and learning. Before coming to Glasgow, Kasia spent four years working in a teaching-focussed role at the University of Edinburgh, where she studied the extent to which first-year students identify with their study discipline or university, and whether this has consequences for their educational outcomes or wellbeing. Now, in collaboration with Dr Eva Murzyn from the University of Edinburgh, Kasia is working on a longitudinal project exploring the use of lecture recordings among first-year Psychology students.

Link to talk announcement.

6 Mar: Dr Eilidh Cage | Supporting Autistic Students: Understanding Drop Out, Camouflaging and First Impressions

Supporting Autistic Students: Understanding Drop Out, Camouflaging and First Impressions

Dr Eilidh Cage
(Lecturer in Psychology | University of Stirling, UK)

Friday, 6 March 2020 @ 4pm | Seminar room (5th floor) | 62 Hillhead Street, Glasgow G12 8QB

Abstract: 

Autistic students are at higher risk of dropping out of university, yet this risk is little understood. In this research, quantitative and qualitative methods were used to examine (a) the different factors that may relate to university completion for autistic people and (b) the experiences of autistic people who had dropped out of university. Quantitative findings indicated that social and academic challenges, and in particular finding the transition to university difficult, contributed to the risk of dropping out. Qualitative findings identified several systemic issues – such as difficulties accessing diagnosis and poor autism understanding – as well as specific challenges within university – such as culture shock and a lack of proactive support. This talk will also touch upon other research findings regarding camouflaging (hiding or masking the fact one is autistic) and first impressions (how autistic people are perceived by non-autistic people on first meeting), and how these apply to the Higher Education context. Together, these findings suggest there is still a long way to go to ensure equal opportunities for autistic students.

About the speaker:

Dr Eilidh Cage completed her PhD at the Centre for Research in Autism and Education (CRAE) at the UCL Institute of Education. She worked as a Lecturer (Teaching-Focused) at Royal Holloway, University of London (2015-2019) before starting as a Lecturer at the University of Stirling in January 2020. Her research interests focus primarily on the experiences of autistic adolescents and adults. For example, she is interested in camouflaging behaviours, autism acceptance (both in terms of from self and others), mental health in autism and the experiences of autistic students at university. You can follow her on Twitter: @DrEilidh

20 Feb: Dr Carolina Kuepper-Tetzel | Effects of Seductive Details on Learning and Memory

Effects of Seductive Details on Learning and Memory

Dr Carolina Kuepper-Tetzel
(Lecturer in Psychology | University of Glasgow, UK)

Thursday, 20 February 2020 @ 4pm | Seminar room (5th floor) | 62 Hillhead Street, Glasgow G12 8QB

Abstract: 

One common approach to make topics more interesting to students is to add entertaining, but irrelevant information during teaching. This could be in form of enriching explanations of the target topic with funny anecdotes or engaging pictures. The effects of adding such seductive details during instruction has been intensively researched in cognitive psychology – painting a rather negative picture of them. Many studies show a detrimental effect of seductive details on memory and transfer performance. Important learner and context variables have been revealed that moderate the effect and that should be taken into consideration before adding seductive details. This talk will present an overview of the current findings on seductive details and provide practical recommendations for teaching practice

About the speaker:

Dr Carolina Kuepper-Tetzel is an expert in applying findings from Cognitive Science to education and an enthusiastic science communicator. She obtained her Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology from the University of Mannheim and pursued postdoc positions at York University in Toronto and the Center for Integrative Research in Cognition, Learning, and Education (CIRCLE) at Washington University in St. Louis. She was a Lecturer in Psychology at the University of Dundee for four years before starting as a Lecturer in Psychology at the University of Glasgow in January 2020. Her expertise focuses on learning and memory phenomena that allow implementation to educational settings to offer teachers and students a wide range of strategies that promote long-term retention. Carolina is convinced that psychological research should serve the public and, to that end, engages heavily in scholarly outreach and science communication. She is a member of the Learning Scientists and founded the Teaching Innovation & Learning Enhancement (TILE) network. Carolina was awarded Senior Fellow of HEA. She is passionate about teaching and aims at providing her students with the best learning experience possible. You can follow her on Twitter: @pimpmymemory

TILE Talks 2019

2019 Topic Speaker Booking Where
21 February
@ 4PM
Why Don’t Students Use Effective Learning Strategies? Dr Flávia Belham
(Chief Scientist Officer, Seneca Learning)
this sentence is invisible UoD Scrymgeour Room 1.57
25 March
@ 4PM
Generating a Sense of Belonging with Online Learners Dr Susie Schofield
(Senior Lecturer, University of Dundee)
TILE Webinar Room
25 April
@ 4PM
The Psychology of Assessment and Feedback Processes in Higher Education Dr Naomi Winstone (Head of the Department of Higher Education, University of Surrey) UoD Scrymgeour Room 4.34
30 May
@ 4PM
Cognitive Science in the Maths Classroom Stuart Welsh (Head of Maths and Research Lead at The High School of Glasgow) his sentence is invisible UoD Scrymgeour Room 4.34
SUMMER BREAK
30 October
@ 4PM  
Lecture Capture: Pedagogy, Policy and Practicalities Dr Emily Nordmann (Lecturer in School of Psychology, University of Glasgow) his sentence is invisible TILE Webinar Room
15 November
@ 4PM
Powerful Teaching: Unleash the Science of Learning Dr Pooja K. Agarwal (Assistant Professor, Berklee College of Music in Boston, USA) his sentence is invisible TILE Webinar Room

TILE Talks 2018

 2018  Topic  Speaker Booking Where
21 February
@ 4PM
Kick-Off Meeting Dr Carolina Kuepper-Tetzel
(Lecturer in Psychology, TILE Founder)
this sentence is invisible UoD Scrymgeour Room 2.32
21 March
@ 4PM
Nothing Works Everywhere: Evidence-Based Approaches To Learning And Teaching Mark Healy
(Deputy Head St. Andrews High School Teacher, Coatbridge)
this sentence is invisible UoD Scrymgeour Room 2.12
18 April
@ 4PM
What Is Education For? A Defence of Knowledge, the Enlightenment, and the Academy Dr Stuart Waiton
(Senior Lecturer, Sociology, Abertay University)
this sentence is invisible UoD Scrymgeour Room 2.12
16 May
@ 4PM
The Myth of Sisyphus: Assessment and Absurdity Robin Macpherson (Assistant Rector, Dollar Academy) this sentence is invisible UoD Scrymgeour Room 2.12
SUMMER BREAK
25 September @ 2:30PM Understanding How We Remember Dr Christopher Madan
(Assistant Professor, Psychology, University of Nottingham)
this sentence is invisible UoD Scrymgeour Room 4.34
25 October
@ 2:30PM
Applied Research in Classrooms Dr Peter Verkoeijen
(Associate Professor, Psychology, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands)
this sentence is invisible UoD Scrymgeour Room 4.34
28 November
@ 4PM
Reduce Workload; Increase Impact Ross Morrison McGill (Managing Director, TeacherToolkit Ltd.) This sentence is invisible UoD
Scrymgeour 2.08
12 December @ 4PM A Perspective on Multilingualism in Education Argyro Kanaki
(Lecturer in Education, University of Dundee)
This sentence is invisible UoD Scrymgeour Room 4.34

About TILE

TILE is a new, interdisciplinary network that spans across educational sectors. Our mission is to start a conversation between different groups interested in improving teaching and learning through sharing of best practice in education and disseminating research-based findings. Read our full mission statement here.

Get in touch

If you want to contribute to our blog or share your best practice with us (we feature best practice examples here), please get in touch: tile@psy.gla.ac.uk

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