Teaching Innovation & Learning Enhancement

Bringing people from different disciplines and sectors together to discuss ways to overcome issues in education using evidence-based findings

About TILE

TILE is a new, interdisciplinary network that spans across educational sectors. Our mission is to start a conversation between different groups interested in improving teaching and learning through sharing of best practice in education and disseminating research-based findings. Read our full mission statement here.

Get in touch

If you want to contribute to our blog or share your best practice with us (we feature best practice examples here), please get in touch: tile@psy.gla.ac.uk

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TILE Talks

TILE Talks 2020

20 Feb: Dr Carolina Kuepper-Tetzel | Effects of Seductive Details on Learning and Memory

Effects of Seductive Details on Learning and Memory

Dr Carolina Kuepper-Tetzel
(Lecturer in Psychology | University of Glasgow, UK)

Thursday, 20 February 2020 @ 4pm | Seminar room (5th floor) | 62 Hillhead Street, Glasgow G12 8QB

Abstract: 

One common approach to make topics more interesting to students is to add entertaining, but irrelevant information during teaching. This could be in form of enriching explanations of the target topic with funny anecdotes or engaging pictures. The effects of adding such seductive details during instruction has been intensively researched in cognitive psychology – painting a rather negative picture of them. Many studies show a detrimental effect of seductive details on memory and transfer performance. Important learner and context variables have been revealed that moderate the effect and that should be taken into consideration before adding seductive details. This talk will present an overview of the current findings on seductive details and provide practical recommendations for teaching practice

About the speaker:

Dr Carolina Kuepper-Tetzel is an expert in applying findings from Cognitive Science to education and an enthusiastic science communicator. She obtained her Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology from the University of Mannheim and pursued postdoc positions at York University in Toronto and the Center for Integrative Research in Cognition, Learning, and Education (CIRCLE) at Washington University in St. Louis. She was a Lecturer in Psychology at the University of Dundee for four years before starting as a Lecturer in Psychology at the University of Glasgow in January 2020. Her expertise focuses on learning and memory phenomena that allow implementation to educational settings to offer teachers and students a wide range of strategies that promote long-term retention. Carolina is convinced that psychological research should serve the public and, to that end, engages heavily in scholarly outreach and science communication. She is a member of the Learning Scientists and founded the Teaching Innovation & Learning Enhancement (TILE) network. Carolina was awarded Senior Fellow of HEA. She is passionate about teaching and aims at providing her students with the best learning experience possible. You can follow her on Twitter: @pimpmymemory

6 Mar: Dr Eilidh Cage | Supporting Autistic Students: Understanding Drop Out, Camouflaging and First Impressions

Supporting Autistic Students: Understanding Drop Out, Camouflaging and First Impressions

Dr Eilidh Cage
(Lecturer in Psychology | University of Stirling, UK)

Friday, 6 March 2020 @ 4pm | Seminar room (5th floor) | 62 Hillhead Street, Glasgow G12 8QB

Abstract: 

Autistic students are at higher risk of dropping out of university, yet this risk is little understood. In this research, quantitative and qualitative methods were used to examine (a) the different factors that may relate to university completion for autistic people and (b) the experiences of autistic people who had dropped out of university. Quantitative findings indicated that social and academic challenges, and in particular finding the transition to university difficult, contributed to the risk of dropping out. Qualitative findings identified several systemic issues – such as difficulties accessing diagnosis and poor autism understanding – as well as specific challenges within university – such as culture shock and a lack of proactive support. This talk will also touch upon other research findings regarding camouflaging (hiding or masking the fact one is autistic) and first impressions (how autistic people are perceived by non-autistic people on first meeting), and how these apply to the Higher Education context. Together, these findings suggest there is still a long way to go to ensure equal opportunities for autistic students.

About the speaker:

Dr Eilidh Cage completed her PhD at the Centre for Research in Autism and Education (CRAE) at the UCL Institute of Education. She worked as a Lecturer (Teaching-Focused) at Royal Holloway, University of London (2015-2019) before starting as a Lecturer at the University of Stirling in January 2020. Her research interests focus primarily on the experiences of autistic adolescents and adults. For example, she is interested in camouflaging behaviours, autism acceptance (both in terms of from self and others), mental health in autism and the experiences of autistic students at university. You can follow her on Twitter: @DrEilidh

18 Mar: Dr Kasia Banas | How Do First-Year Psychology Students Study? Embedding Lecture Recording in Wider Study Practices

How Do First-Year Psychology Students Study? Embedding Lecture Recording in Wider Study Practices.

Dr Kasia Banas
(Lecturer in Behavioural Sciences in Healthcare | University of Glasgow, UK)

Wednesday, 18 March 2020 @ 4pm | Seminar room (5th floor) | 62 Hillhead Street, Glasgow G12 8QB

Abstract: 

[abstract to follow]

About the speaker:

Dr Kasia Banas is a Lecturer in Behavioural Sciences in Healthcare within the School of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing, University of Glasgow. She is a social psychologist by training and has a keen interest in how social factors influence behaviour, including studying and learning. Before coming to Glasgow, Kasia spent four years working in a teaching-focussed role at the University of Edinburgh, where she studied the extent to which first-year students identify with their study discipline or university, and whether this has consequences for their educational outcomes or wellbeing. Now, in collaboration with Dr Eva Murzyn from the University of Edinburgh, Kasia is working on a longitudinal project exploring the use of lecture recordings among first-year Psychology students.

16 Apr: Dr Jill MacKay | Playful Learning in Professional Degrees: Horsing Around With Vet Students

Playful Learning in Professional Degrees: Horsing Around With Vet Students

Dr Jill MacKay
(Research Fellow in Veterinary Medical Education | The University of Edinburgh, UK)

Thursday, 16 April 2020 @ 4pm | Meeting room (6th floor) | 62 Hillhead Street, Glasgow G12 8QB

Abstract: 

Education programmes have a responsibility to teach their students resilience and adaptability, and this is particularly important in professionalised programmes such as veterinary medicine where ‘failures’ can be high cost and relatively common. Playful scenarios can be a useful tool in these settings, particularly if they encourage learners to deal with uncomfortable situations in a managed space. In partnership with students, we developed a playful roleplay scenario for first year veterinary students in a UK veterinary school. After our second year of running the scenario, we offer our perspective on the value of play in professionalised settings, and how failure and resilience training can be scaffolded into learning and teaching throughout a programme.

About the speaker:

Dr Jill MacKay is a Lecturer in Veterinary Science Education at the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies. Her research interests mainly lie within research methodology and exploring how students learn in digital environments. She has been known to play the odd video game. You can follow her on Twitter: @jilly_mackay.

21 May: Dr Yvonne Skipper | “I think I can”: Using Mindset-Based Interventions in the Classroom

“I think I can”: Using Mindset-Based Interventions in the Classroom

Dr Yvonne Skipper
(Senior Lecturer in Psychology | School of Education | University of Glasgow, UK)

Thursday, 21 May 2020 @ 4pm | Meeting room (6th floor) | 62 Hillhead Street, Glasgow G12 8QB

Abstract: 

Carol Dweck’s work on mindsets suggests that people view intelligence in different ways. Some view intelligence as malleable (a growth mindset) while others view it as a stable trait (termed a fixed mindset). Literature has suggested that more of a growth mindset can lead to positive educational outcomes such as holding learning rather than performance goals and persisting following failure.
In this presentation, I will discuss how we have used this framework in three ways. Firstly, we developed a mindset intervention for university students. The intervention group participated in a session which explored brain plasticity, which is a component of growth mindset belief, while the control group learned about memory. Results suggested that the intervention promoted more of a growth mindset and led to more positive learning behaviours. Secondly, we worked with Stoke-on-Trent City Council to co-create a growth mindset toolkit for Year 1 school pupils which aimed to enhance literacy. This light touch intervention was trialled with N=443 pupils from 5 intervention and 4 control schools. Results suggested that the intervention promoted more of a growth mindset and enhanced phonics and sentence reading but not comprehension. Finally, we developed ‘White Water Writers’, an intervention which gives groups of people the opportunity to collaboratively write and publish a full-length novel in a week (www.whitewaterwriters.com). This aims to promote self-belief and literacy. Data from interviews, school results and pre and post-test questionnaires suggests that the project enhances literacy and self-belief.
Taken together these findings suggest that while there is some debate around the theory of mindsets and how the framework fits together, our interventions have had a positive impact on learners.

 

About the speaker:
Dr Yvonne Skipper recently moved to the University of Glasgow as a Senior Lecturer in Psychology. Her research focusses how we can motivate and engage learners of all ages. She researches topics such as teacher feedback, how peers learn together and why girls drop out of science subjects. She is passionate about moving theory into practice and ensuring that my work has a real-world impact.
She uses a co-creation approach, working closely with partner organisations to bring together psychology and ‘real world’ knowledge to solve educational problems. She has developed of a number of initiatives, such as a toolkit to promote a malleable view of intelligence and ‘White Water Writers’, which gives groups of people the opportunity to write and publish their own novel in a week.

TILE Talks 2019

2019 Topic Speaker Booking Where
21 February
@ 4PM
Why Don’t Students Use Effective Learning Strategies? Dr Flávia Belham
(Chief Scientist Officer, Seneca Learning)
this sentence is invisible UoD Scrymgeour Room 1.57
25 March
@ 4PM
Generating a Sense of Belonging with Online Learners Dr Susie Schofield
(Senior Lecturer, University of Dundee)
TILE Webinar Room
25 April
@ 4PM
The Psychology of Assessment and Feedback Processes in Higher Education Dr Naomi Winstone (Head of the Department of Higher Education, University of Surrey) UoD Scrymgeour Room 4.34
30 May
@ 4PM
Cognitive Science in the Maths Classroom Stuart Welsh (Head of Maths and Research Lead at The High School of Glasgow) his sentence is invisible UoD Scrymgeour Room 4.34
SUMMER BREAK
30 October
@ 4PM  
Lecture Capture: Pedagogy, Policy and Practicalities Dr Emily Norman (Lecturer in School of Psychology, University of Glasgow) his sentence is invisible TILE Webinar Room
15 November
@ 4PM
Powerful Teaching: Unleash the Science of Learning Dr Pooja K. Agarwal (Assistant Professor, Berklee College of Music in Boston, USA) his sentence is invisible TILE Webinar Room

TILE Talks 2018

 2018  Topic  Speaker Booking Where
21 February
@ 4PM
Kick-Off Meeting Dr Carolina Kuepper-Tetzel
(Lecturer in Psychology, TILE Founder)
this sentence is invisible UoD Scrymgeour Room 2.32
21 March
@ 4PM
Nothing Works Everywhere: Evidence-Based Approaches To Learning And Teaching Mark Healy
(Deputy Head St. Andrews High School Teacher, Coatbridge)
this sentence is invisible UoD Scrymgeour Room 2.12
18 April
@ 4PM
What Is Education For? A Defence of Knowledge, the Enlightenment, and the Academy Dr Stuart Waiton
(Senior Lecturer, Sociology, Abertay University)
this sentence is invisible UoD Scrymgeour Room 2.12
16 May
@ 4PM
The Myth of Sisyphus: Assessment and Absurdity Robin Macpherson (Assistant Rector, Dollar Academy) this sentence is invisible UoD Scrymgeour Room 2.12
SUMMER BREAK
25 September @ 2:30PM Understanding How We Remember Dr Christopher Madan
(Assistant Professor, Psychology, University of Nottingham)
this sentence is invisible UoD Scrymgeour Room 4.34
25 October
@ 2:30PM
Applied Research in Classrooms Dr Peter Verkoeijen
(Associate Professor, Psychology, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands)
this sentence is invisible UoD Scrymgeour Room 4.34
28 November
@ 4PM
Reduce Workload; Increase Impact Ross Morrison McGill (Managing Director, TeacherToolkit Ltd.) This sentence is invisible UoD
Scrymgeour 2.08
12 December @ 4PM A Perspective on Multilingualism in Education Argyro Kanaki
(Lecturer in Education, University of Dundee)
This sentence is invisible UoD Scrymgeour Room 4.34

About TILE

TILE is a new, interdisciplinary network that spans across educational sectors. Our mission is to start a conversation between different groups interested in improving teaching and learning through sharing of best practice in education and disseminating research-based findings. Read our full mission statement here.

Get in touch

If you want to contribute to our blog or share your best practice with us (we feature best practice examples here), please get in touch: tile@psy.gla.ac.uk

Subscribe for TILE Updates

* indicates required

Please select the option below if you agree to receive emails with updates from the TILE Network:


You can unsubscribe at any time by clicking the link in the footer of our emails. For information about our privacy practices, please visit our website.

We use Mailchimp as our platform to manage subscriptions. By clicking below to subscribe, you acknowledge that your information will be transferred to Mailchimp for processing. Learn more about Mailchimp's privacy practices here.

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